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Quantitative Finance

New submissions

[ total of 7 entries: 1-7 ]
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New submissions for Wed, 18 May 22

[1]  arXiv:2205.08042 [pdf, ps, other]
Title: The Impact of the Social Security Reforms on Welfare:Who benefits and loses across Generations, Gender, andEmployment Type?
Subjects: General Economics (econ.GN)

We quantitatively explore the impact of social security reforms in Japan, facing rapid aging and the highest government debt among developed countries, using an overlapping generations model with four types of agents distinguished by gender and employment type. We find that social security reforms without extending the retirement age raise the welfare of future generations, while the reforms with raising copayment rates for medical and long-term care expenditures, in particular, significantly lower the welfare of low-income groups (females and part-timers) of the current retired and working generations. In contrast, the reform reducing the pension replacement rate lead to a greater decline in the welfare of full-timers. The combination of these reforms and the extension of the retirement age is expected to improve the welfare of the current working generations by 2--9\% over the level without reforms.

[2]  arXiv:2205.08112 [pdf, ps, other]
Title: The Fairness of Machine Learning in Insurance: New Rags for an Old Man?
Subjects: General Economics (econ.GN); Computers and Society (cs.CY)

Since the beginning of their history, insurers have been known to use data to classify and price risks. As such, they were confronted early on with the problem of fairness and discrimination associated with data. This issue is becoming increasingly important with access to more granular and behavioural data, and is evolving to reflect current technologies and societal concerns. By looking into earlier debates on discrimination, we show that some algorithmic biases are a renewed version of older ones, while others show a reversal of the previous order. Paradoxically, while the insurance practice has not deeply changed nor are most of these biases new, the machine learning era still deeply shakes the conception of insurance fairness.

[3]  arXiv:2205.08435 [pdf, other]
Title: Cyber Risk Assessment for Capital Management
Comments: This paper was first presented on July 5, 2021, at the 24th International Congress on Insurance: Mathematics and Economics
Subjects: Risk Management (q-fin.RM); Cryptography and Security (cs.CR); General Economics (econ.GN); Optimization and Control (math.OC)

Cyber risk is an omnipresent risk in the increasingly digitized world that is known to be difficult to quantify and assess. Despite the fact that cyber risk shows distinct characteristics from conventional risks, most existing models for cyber risk in the insurance literature have been purely based on frequency-severity analysis, which was developed for classical property and casualty risks. In contrast, the cybersecurity engineering literature employs different approaches, under which cyber incidents are viewed as threats or hacker attacks acting on a particular set of vulnerabilities. There appears a gap in cyber risk modeling between engineering and insurance literature. This paper presents a novel model to capture these unique dynamics of cyber risk known from engineering and to model loss distributions based on industry loss data and a particular company's cybersecurity profile. The analysis leads to a new tool for allocating resources of the company between cybersecurity investments and loss-absorbing reserves.

Cross-lists for Wed, 18 May 22

[4]  arXiv:2205.08104 (cross-list from cs.GT) [pdf, other]
Title: Sequential Elimination Contests with All-Pay Auctions
Subjects: Computer Science and Game Theory (cs.GT); General Economics (econ.GN)

By modeling contests as all-pay auctions, we study two-stage sequential elimination contests (SEC) under incomplete information, where only the players with top efforts in the first stage can proceed to the second and final stage to compete for prizes. Players have privately held type/ability information that impacts their costs of exerting efforts. We characterize players' Perfect Bayesian Equilibrium strategies and discover a somewhat surprising result: all players exert weakly lower efforts in the final stage of the SEC compared to those under a one-round contest, regardless of the number of players admitted to the final stage. This result holds under any multi-prize reward structure, any type distribution and cost function. As a consequence, in terms of the expected highest effort or total efforts of the final stage, the optimal SEC is equivalent to a one-round contest by letting all players proceed to the final stage.

Replacements for Wed, 18 May 22

[5]  arXiv:2106.09978 (replaced) [pdf, ps, other]
Title: Centralized systemic risk control in the interbank system: Weak formulation and Gamma-convergence
Comments: Final version, forthcoming in Stochastic Processes and their Applications
Subjects: Optimization and Control (math.OC); Mathematical Finance (q-fin.MF)
[6]  arXiv:2201.12898 (replaced) [pdf, other]
Title: Clearing Payments in Dynamic Financial Networks
Subjects: Optimization and Control (math.OC); Computational Engineering, Finance, and Science (cs.CE); Systems and Control (eess.SY); Mathematical Finance (q-fin.MF); Risk Management (q-fin.RM)
[7]  arXiv:2205.07742 (replaced) [pdf]
Title: Predicting Emotional Volatility Using 41,000 Participants in the United Kingdom
Comments: 30 pages, 1 figure, 2 tables
Subjects: General Economics (econ.GN)
[ total of 7 entries: 1-7 ]
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